Category Archives: Genesis 3

Why mortality? To learn.

While not speaking to creation, this extract from a 1960 article by Jean Galbraith caught our eye so we thought we would share it.  It suggests (with good reason) why Adam & Eve were necessarily subject to temptation.  Her broader subject was converting knowledge into action via the experience of good and evil.

“Our whole life, and the reason for it, is nothing but an opportunity for turning these good  things [bible readings, verses, poems, wise sayings] into living experience.

Why did Adam and all his descendants have to work up through the training-ground of mortal life to immortality ? Simply because it was no use merely telling them, as it is no use merely telling us, “In the day thou eatest thereof thou shalt surely die”. We can learn it only by experience—as Eve did.

It is no use merely telling us, “1 will never leave thee nor forsake thee”. We have to learn it by experience—as Joshua did. This is the hardest, as well as the most important thing we have to learn—to translate words into reality, to live the things that we say we believe.

We read, ‘ ‘When thou passest through the waters I will be with thee”, and we believe it with our minds, but we never know what it really means until we go through those waters, praying God all the while to be with us, and use the experience we are passing through to make us more able to help others, to teach us through it the lessons He would have us learn.”[1]

A similar article which dealt specifically with why Adam failed is posted here.

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[1] Galbraith, Jean (1960) Shield Magazine (Vol 63, page 7)

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We are all adam

The focus on Adam in Genesis largely misses the point that we are all adam.  Scripture clearly aligns all humanity with the first couple in its language.   Rather than obsess over biology, we should rather take the point of the demonstration of human failure and divine grace which Gen 2-3 portrays.  We can chose to be in Adam or in Christ.  Focussing on the later would be healthy.  Following is a brief exploration of the way scripture links us to Adam… Continue reading

A Plain Man looks at Evolution

Bro Ken Drage was a member at Watford when the evolution controversy broke in the 1960s.  He has written an open letter addressing evolution and some of the history from the debate which centred around Bro Lovelock.  The impact of emotion and pressure from others is noteworthy – as is his observation that the 1960’s discussion were civilised though highly charged (such civility is lacking today!).  Bro Ken’s letter is reproduced in full below – it should be mandatory reading, so over to Ken… Continue reading

LG Sargent on the serpent and Gen 3

LG Sargent wrote a in support of a literal serpent (a view we share) after allowing varying viewpoints to be put.  No calls for disfellowship or “common understandings” on the issue.  Tolerance of exploration.  LG Sargent, despite putting his conclusion, acknowledged that there are difficulties of understanding Genesis 3.  He also repeats Bro Thomas’ observation that God placed evil within Adam from the beginning and that trial was part of God’s design.  A worthwhile read highlighting our past ability to consider different views without splitting.

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LG Sargent on freedom of discussion

LG Sargent’s comment around a controversial article suggesting the serpent in Genesis 3 was not literal ( we think it is literal!) was bound to raise eyebrows.  The conclusion of his cover note shows a maturity and tolerance of exploration absent in conservative quarters of our community today.  Rather than seeking to narrow fellowship and man the barricades LG Sargent hoped the community would  “…be capable of reasonable and informed judgment on Scripture interpretation”.  His comments are worth a read:

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Eastward in Eden – past speculations

I believe the serpent in Genesis 3 was a literal being created by God with capabilities for the express purpose of testing Adam & Eve.  The following article “Eastward in Eden” from the 1964 Vol 102 Christadelphian Magazine disagrees, proposing the serpent is a literary device.  Obviously LG Sargent (the editor) disagreed with that assessment.  The article also touches on the ability of Adam & Eve to have evil thoughts.  Once upon a time variances in views and explorations were tolerated and explored – though passionately debated.  Worth a read and consideration of how difference should be dealt with.

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A simple reconciliation

The pioneer approach

Our pioneers believed scientific facts were always in harmony with accurate Biblical interpretation. [1] [2] They believed the earth was extremely old, and that there had been at least one pre-Adamic creation, despite rejecting evolution. They explained the evidence for evolution by arguing God had made many creations over countless years, creating simple life and repeated replacing it with more complex life, finally creating humans in a pre-Adamic creation,[3] then creating the current creation with Adam and Eve.

Over the years, Christadelphian expositors accepted increasingly higher estimates of the age of the earth, and went further and further in their interpretation of Genesis in order to reconcile it with demonstrable scientific facts. Thus on the basis of geological evidence available to him, brother Thomas believed there had been one pre-Adamic creation; later brother Roberts agreed with brother Simons that there was now geological and fossil evidence of at least five pre-Adamic creations. Continue reading