Category Archives: Genesis 1

Reading Genesis 1 literally

Creationists claim to read Genesis literally. This indeed is one of the proclamations made in the IEAC Reaffirmation Statement which says in its background that the various signatories “accept the creation record as literal in its details”.  This is a fine sounding declaration.  We thought we would align Genesis 1 in the KJV with the old earth creation model promoted by The Lampstand Magazine (a promoter of the Reaffirmation Statement).  Lots of words had to be deleted or added.  Be warned you might be upset.  The intention is not to upset but rather demonstrate the old earth creation view is NOT a literal reading.  Neither is the young earth creationist view, as should also be evidence from the below. Continue reading


By One Man – a misleading incomplete picture of Christadelphian positions

In May 2017 bro Colin Byrnes (a rightly well-regarded individual), published a document called “By One Man”.  The document was largely in response to a presentation at the 2016 Australian Conference which demonstrated a wide range of views have been accepted in the community on Genesis 1-3 (note that presentation specifically stayed away from EC as requested by the conference organisers). Continue reading

Vegetarianism and Creation

We received the following question from a reader and brother.  Rather than lose the question in a mess of other discussions we thought it worth a special response.  While the question may have been raised before it pretty much escaped our notice.  The question was:

Dear COD

I have tried to show throughout this book that we must let the Bible speak for itself. We must not twist it, to make it mean what we think it ought to have said. We must let it make its own message clear to us.”[1] 

I did ask the question on another post about how an EC would interpret the verses that appear to identify a change in diet, to becoming carnivores, before/after the flood. The language appears quite clear to me. Perhaps this provides an opportunity to answer that question?” Continue reading

CC Walker Christadelphian Magazine Editor

CC Walker pointed out problems with a literal Genesis reading

Bro CC Walker, editor of the Christadelphian Magazine after Robert Roberts, Wrote a series of articles in the magazine in 1910.  Commenting on Genesis 1 he observed the evidence did not support a young earth and strangely there was no evidence of the cessation and restart of life 6,000 years ago which is what a literal reading of Genesis 1 requires.  He reminds us that Genesis 1 is not teaching us science and our interpretation of it could be adjusted by further scientific discoveries.  Walker was no fan of evolution but would be shunned by creationists today. Continue reading


3 models to interpret creation

The first two chapters of Genesis present an intriguing dilemma: two individual creation accounts with strikingly different features, which appear to contradict each other (Bosman 2004, p.43). A survey of three interpretative models – historical, polemical, and theological – will demonstrate the importance of contextualising Genesis. When returned to its original socio-historical setting, the creation narrative develops new meaning and a clearer purpose emerges. Continue reading


My Encounter with the Firmament –

A fascinating Jewish perspective, reviewing the history of Jewish interpretation of the firmament.  From the article:

The Torah describes God’s fashioning the firmament (רקיע) on the second day of creation. This piece of the universe, however, doesn’t actually exist—a problem obfuscated in my yeshiva education…Every pre-Copernican commentator in Judaism who wrote about the rakia knew exactly what it was.[8] The Talmud, for instance, records varying opinions about the thickness of what is clearly a solid firmament; from the seven layer firmaments of Resh Lakish (b. Chagigah 12b), to the two firmaments of R Judah (ibid.), from the finger-width firmament of Rav Joshua ben R Nehemia (Gen. Rab. 4:5), to the “50 year journey” firmament of Rav Judah (j. Berachot 2c).

Source: My Encounter with the Firmament –


Very Good comment in the Testimony Magazine

We have written a fairly lengthy article on the meaning of the expression “very good” in Genesis 1.  Suffice it to say we believe the phrase means everything was really good.  From the sea, to the trees, to the serpent and even humanity, the whole work of creation was a job well done.  While the component parts may have been good, the work collectively was very much more so.  There is no moral or superhuman overtones to the phrase in the context of Genesis 1 or in its many uses later in the Old Testament. Continue reading